Roma population as another aspect of the Slovak economy

Slovakia belongs among countries with the highest share of the Roma population in Europe.
The Roma are not living in an integrated territory but are rather scattered within the entire territory of Slovakia. However, there are big differences in their number and concentration in particular regions of the Slovak Republic.
The oldest information on the number of Roma in Slovakia originating from the census as of the end of 18th century speaks about 20 thousand Roma. At the 1991 census the inhabitants of Slovakia had a possibility for the first time after 60 years to declare the Roma nationality. Only less than 76 thousand people used this possibility. The reasons why Roma do not declare the Roma nationality are several– from the insufficiently developed ethnic awareness which often appears as an effort to dissociate from the Roma ethnic group, up to the fear from the persecution and discrimination.
Presently, there are 380 000 Romas living in the territory of Slovakia and The Projection of Roma Population in Slovakia until 2025 was made.

Mainly the geographic location of the Slovak Republic being the centre of Europe and the historical development linked to significant mobility of population are signed under the heterogeneous ethnic composition of population.

In order to extend and speed up the social inclusion of the Roma population including improvement of their social status The National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic Regarding the Decade of Roma Inclusion 2005 – 2015 was adopted. It focuses on four priority areas: education, employment, health, housing and on three related themes: poverty, discrimination and gender equality. The last pages of this document show also the budget for each area discussed.

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7 thoughts on “Roma population as another aspect of the Slovak economy

  1. The Roma or “Gypsies” form the second largest minority group in Slovakia- around 8 % of the population. This data is approximate (hard find such tender info:))

    The Romany population tends to suffer from higher rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, crime and disease. When discussing “the Roma problem”, most references focus on the part of the Romany population living in very poor rural and urban conditions. The number of Roma living in unbearable conditions in rural communities and devastated central city zones is agglomerating and represents a potentially very serious societal, social and economic problem. Roma often live 2-3 kilometers outside of a village in camps of settlements with only a few dirty houses without facilities, in cellars, or in cardboard or wooden shacks. Some of the camps, such as the one near Rudnany in Eastern Slovakia, were built on dumping grounds or other areas containing materials such as mercury and arsenic.

    Ideally, the problems of the Roma and other minorities should be solved on regional and community levels. It is essential to create mechanisms for constant consultation between communities’ leaderships and minority representatives and organizations. Solutions to the problems of a region’s minorities must be integrated with that region’s overall development. Ideally, the central government should create effective administrative and judicial mechanisms to remedy discriminatory acts against Roma and other minorities. Furthermore, it should provide services to the regions to help them more comprehensively integrate the development of Roma and other minority communities. Without a more decentralized approach to regional development (e.g. a better-functioning banking system to provide loans, more local authority in real rather than formal terms), even the most well-intentioned local governments will be unable to seriously address these problems.

    Reply
  2. The Roma or “Gypsies” form the second largest minority group in Slovakia- around 8 % of the population. This data is approximate due to perceptiveness of this info…

    The Romany population tends to suffer from higher rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, crime and disease. When discussing “the Roma problem”, most references focus on the part of the Romany population living in very poor rural and urban conditions. The number of Roma living in unbearable conditions in rural communities and devastated central city zones is agglomerating and represents a potentially very serious societal, social and economic problem. Roma often live 2-3 kilometers outside of a village in camps of settlements with only a few dirty houses without facilities, in cellars, or in cardboard or wooden shacks. Some of the camps, such as the one near Rudnany in Eastern Slovakia, were built on dumping grounds or other areas containing materials such as mercury and arsenic.

    Ideally, the problems of the Roma and other minorities should be solved on regional and community levels. It is essential to create mechanisms for constant consultation between communities’ leaderships and minority representatives and organizations. Solutions to the problems of a region’s minorities must be integrated with that region’s overall development. Ideally, the central government should create effective administrative and judicial mechanisms to remedy discriminatory acts against Roma and other minorities. Furthermore, it should provide services to the regions to help them more comprehensively integrate the development of Roma and other minority communities. Without a more decentralized approach to regional development (e.g. a better-functioning banking system to provide loans, more local authority in real rather than formal terms), even the most well-intentioned local governments will be unable to seriously address these problems.

    Reply
  3. Many Roma in Slovenia today are stateless and without any personal documents. The failure of the Slovene state to regulate their legal status exposes these individuals to grave violations of their fundamental human rights. Slovene legislation distinguishes two categories of minorities and Roma, respectively – “non-autochthonous” and “autochthonous”. Only “autochthonous” minorities (“autochthonous” Roma, Hungarian and Italian national minorities) enjoy the special minority protection accorded by domestic and international standards. Roma form less than 1% of Slovenia’s population of two million.

    Reply
  4. The Roma or “Gypsies” form the second largest minority group in Slovakia- around 8 % of the population. This data is approximate due to perceptiveness of this info…

    The Romany population tends to suffer from higher rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, crime and disease. When discussing “the Roma problem”, most references focus on the part of the Romany population living in very poor rural and urban conditions. The number of Roma living in unbearable conditions in rural communities and devastated central city zones is agglomerating and represents a potentially very serious societal, social and economic problem. Roma often live 2-3 kilometers outside of a village in camps of settlements with only a few dirty houses without facilities, in cellars, or in cardboard or wooden shacks. Some of the camps, such as the one near Rudnany in Eastern Slovakia, were built on dumping grounds or other areas containing materials such as mercury and arsenic.

    Ideally, the problems of the Roma and other minorities should be solved on regional and community levels. It is essential to create mechanisms for constant consultation between communities’ leaderships and minority representatives and organizations. Solutions to the problems of a region’s minorities must be integrated with that region’s overall development. Ideally, the central government should create effective administrative and judicial mechanisms to remedy discriminatory acts against Roma and other minorities. Furthermore, it should provide services to the regions to help them more comprehensively integrate the development of Roma and other minority communities. Without a more decentralized approach to regional development (e.g. a better-functioning banking system to provide loans, more local authority in real rather than formal terms), even the most well-intentioned local governments will be unable to seriously address these problems.
    The question is how long it will continue?

    Reply
  5. The Roma or “Gypsies” form the second largest minority group in Slovakia- around 8 % of the population. This data is approximate due to perceptiveness of this info…

    The Romany population tends to suffer from higher rates of poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, crime and disease. When discussing “the Roma problem”, most references focus on the part of the Romany population living in very poor rural and urban conditions. The number of Roma living in unbearable conditions in rural communities and devastated central city zones is agglomerating and represents a potentially very serious societal, social and economic problem. Roma often live 2-3 kilometers outside of a village in camps of settlements with only a few dirty houses without facilities, in cellars, or in cardboard or wooden shacks. Some of the camps, such as the one near Rudnany in Eastern Slovakia, were built on dumping grounds or other areas containing materials such as mercury and arsenic.

    Ideally, the problems of the Roma and other minorities should be solved on regional and community levels. It is essential to create mechanisms for constant consultation between communities’ leaderships and minority representatives and organizations. Solutions to the problems of a region’s minorities must be integrated with that region’s overall development. Ideally, the central government should create effective administrative and judicial mechanisms to remedy discriminatory acts against Roma and other minorities. Furthermore, it should provide services to the regions to help them more comprehensively integrate the development of Roma and other minority communities. Without a more decentralized approach to regional development (e.g. a better-functioning banking system to provide loans, more local authority in real rather than formal terms), even the most well-intentioned local governments will be unable to seriously address these problems.
    The question is how long it will continue?

    Reply
  6. I think this Roma problem is a neverending story. They have been in our country for many years and they will live there also in the future, so the problems will always exist. Roma people have their own nature and we can not change it. Everybody talks about how to integrate gypsies into “normal” society, but I think it is a very long process, better said it is almost impossible as the majority of them are not willing to change their manners. To be honest I do not wonder that they have to face prejudicies, racism or discrimination from non-Roma population every day. For sure there should be more intervetions of governments and other competent people but in spite of this I think that this problem will never be solved till the Romas are here…

    Reply
  7. I have another remark to the neverending story:

    If we should talk about integration of Roma population, we should first ask whether they want to be integrated. Integration means that they should be fully accepted into the economical life with rights but also duties. But the thing is, most of the Romas /and this is not only a prejudice/ just expect to get money from the economical system of the state without actively doing something. This is not how the integration works!

    Those of Romas who are responsible and aware of the benefits of active attending in the economical life are already integrated and do not need any help from the government. For those who just want to take advantages and abuse the system, no efforts of the government will work.

    Of course, there is another question of education and healthcare. In Slovakia, basic education and healthcare are for free. And parents get children allowances so that they can cover the extra costs. But before some serious changes in our laws, the business of Roma was to give birth to children so that they get more money for them without taking the basic care for them.

    There are many decent people of Roma nationality worth respect. And they do not need any extra integration efforts from the government. Some people know how to live, some do not, no matter their origin, race, nationality, gender…

    Reply

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