Working students (Sept 2008)

The LFS (labour force survey) microdata show high values for the incidence of working students (that is people who wish to complete or continue higher education when working or people who try to develop their education or training or to acquire specific skills) on total employment: in 2005 for the 15-24 age class, it was around 30%, whereas for the 25-29 age class it was under 9%. The percentage of working students is higher for females than males.

For the 15-24 age class, the countries with the highest (above 60%) incidence of working students are Denmark and the Netherlands with the lowest in Luxembourg, Czech Republic and Slovakia (below 6%). These figures clearly show that, whereas the countries with the highest incidence of working students on employment have similar socio-economic conditions (Scandinavian countries and Germany), those in which this incidence is lowest have dissimilar elements.

For the 25-29 age class, the incidence ranges from the 0.2% of Luxembourg to the 21.8% of Denmark. In Europe, one out of two working students aged 15-24 have a part-time contract (for young people not in education the incidence of part-timers is only one out of nine). This percentage is higher for women and drops when passing to the next age class. In some countries, part-time seems the only way for people aged 15-24 to reconcile study with work: in the Netherlands and Sweden more than
85% of working students are part-timers, in Denmark and the UK more than 70%. Working students tend to have more temporary contracts (55.1% of working students against 25.6% of young not in education). The main reasons why working students have temporary contracts are linked to alternating school-work pathways or the fact that temporary work can often be a way to earn money to continue studying.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Working students (Sept 2008)

  1. I am very surprised that in Slovakia is so low indicator of working students as well as that percentage of females is higher then males. I am from Slovakia, and many of my friends like me are working. In my opinion for students is very good to work beside their studies. Here are many reasons why I think this, e.g. students can gain more skills and knowledge; they can realize their knowledge in praktice; they will be prepared better for their life after school. But in other hand many teachers say that this is not so good, I mean working students. For students who are working is their job ofter on first position. They many times do not go to the classes, because of their work. This is not good for their studies.
    It will be very good for student find out job with moving job time. But in many companies this is not possible. 😦

    Reply
  2. Well, I am also wondering why the the percentage of females is higher than male students. Hmmm, maybe we are more hard-working, busy as a bee:-)…, work and study, multitask-talented…
    Since I am studying I always worked during my studies. This is of course possible, as long as you can manage your time, and still concentrate on your studies.
    Niveolo, you ´re right, in many companies it is impossible to find job with moving job time. But I know a lot of job opportunities in Germany offered by companies for only students, providing student work contracts with flexible hours.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s