Satisfying Dutch labour demand through migration.

The Netherlands will face great challenges in the field of labour market policy in the coming years. It is expected that the ageing polulation and the decrease in the proportion of the yoing people in the polulation will cause a decrease in the labour force and an increase in labour shortages. Other member states of the European Union are faced with similar challenges. The question Is if temporary labour migration can fix the labour shortages.
In the Dutch labour migration policy, labour migration forms the final element of measures to be taken to fight labour shortages. The focus is on national measures, such as fixing the gaps between education and the labour market, and increasing the labour participation of unused labour potential (women).
The principle of the demand-driven approach is the main focus of Dutch migration policy. Labour migrants from third countries only become able for a position if that position cannot be filled from the domestic labour offer or the offer from other countries within the European Economic Area.
The subject of labour migration is continuously a subject for political discussion. The indesirable side-effects of labour migration (from other EU countries and from third countries) are a big issue in the political debate. The most prominent subjects of political discussion are:
-Displacement of the domestic labour potential.
-The social security consequences.
-Integration problems.
-Abuse of labour migrants.
The issues of social security and integration problems, has been previously a bad experience in the Netherlands.
It is expected that there will be jobs in the future in the higher sectors for labour migration. The Netherlands won’t be able to fill these position with domestic labours. Think about jobs in the medical sector, service sector, government services and education.

source : http://www.emnnetherlands.nl/EMN_rapporten/2010/Inzet_migratie_op_de_Nederlandse_arbeidsmarkt

4 thoughts on “Satisfying Dutch labour demand through migration.

  1. I think that the Netherlands don’t need employees from other countries. The Netherlands have enough people who wants to work and employers or the government can give them an education to fulfill the job.
    If you do this, you don’t get more people into The Netherlands, cause as we know, The Netherlands is a very small country with a lot of people. It gets to full. And this will be also better for the unemployment rate of The Netherlands.

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  2. It is known that the Netherlands in facing with aging of the population. This might be a reason that there might be not enough people for the labour market in the future, especially for the medical sector. But I think for the other sectors domestic people can fulfill these positions. In the Netherlands there is a good education level and there are many highly educated students, so I don’t think this is the biggest problem. Important is to keep these highly educated people in the Netherlands, then the problem can be solved by domestic people. Another thing is that more and more employees in the Netherlands, specially women, are working part-time, I think that the Dutch people have to work more in full-time jobs in the future to keep the labour market in balance.

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  3. The Netherlands is one of the countries where work a lot of migrants from other European countries. The unemployment rate is relatively low and the Dutch society is aging. However, if in fact it is possible that immigrants are taking jobs the native inhabitants of the country- during the meetings of the European Commision was discussed this problem a few times already. Namely, even half of the migrants gave work to unemployed Dutch the unemployment in the country will probably cease to exist.

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